AutoDrive Dash Cam AutoDrive Dash Cam

SootheEase Massage Cushion SootheEase Massage Cushion SootheSonic Facial Cleanser SootheSonic Facial Cleanser

Shop Now
SleepCloud Sleep Tracker SleepCloud Sleep Tracker

SpinSplash Water Bottle SpinSplash Water Bottle ToneTight Resistance Bands Set ToneTight Resistance Bands Set




Nasal augmentation, also known as rhinoplasty, is a surgical procedure that enhances the shape and size of the nose. It is a popular cosmetic surgery that can improve the appearance of the face and boost self-confidence. Nasal augmentation can also improve the function of the nose by correcting breathing problems caused by structural defects.

There are two types of nasal augmentation procedures: open and closed. Open rhinoplasty involves making an incision in the columella, the tissue that separates the nostrils. This allows the surgeon to lift the skin and tissue of the nose, giving them a better view of the nasal structure. Closed rhinoplasty involves making incisions inside the nostrils, making it a less invasive procedure. Both techniques have their own benefits and risks, and the choice of technique depends on the individual's needs.

The surgeon will typically use either autologous tissue, synthetic material, or a combination of both to augment the nose. Autologous tissue, such as cartilage from the septum or ear, provides a natural-looking and long-lasting result. Synthetic material, such as silicone implants or Gore-Tex, can also provide a satisfactory result but carries a higher risk of complications such as infection and extrusion.

Recovery from nasal augmentation typically takes one to two weeks. Patients may experience bruising, swelling, and discomfort, but these symptoms can be managed with pain medication and ice packs. Patients should avoid strenuous activity and wearing glasses or sunglasses for at least six weeks after surgery. The final result of the surgery may not be fully visible for several months as the swelling subsides and the tissues settle.

In conclusion, nasal augmentation is a safe and effective procedure that can improve the appearance and function of the nose. It is important to choose a skilled and experienced surgeon to ensure the best possible outcome. Patients should also have realistic expectations and understand the risks and benefits of the procedure before undergoing surgery.

Obesity is a medical condition in which a person has an excessive amount of body fat. It is a major health concern worldwide, affecting an estimated 650 million adults. Understanding the symptoms, causes, and treatment options for obesity is essential to preventing and managing this condition.

Symptoms

The symptoms of obesity can vary depending on the individual. However, some common symptoms include:

  1. Body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher
  2. Increased risk of health problems, such as heart disease, diabetes, and high blood pressure
  3. Difficulty breathing, especially during physical activity
  4. Joint pain
  5. Fatigue or weakness
  6. Sleep apnea or other sleep disorders

If you experience any of these symptoms, it's important to see a doctor as soon as possible.

Causes

Obesity can have many causes, including:

  1. Overeating and a lack of physical activity
  2. Genetics and family history
  3. Medical conditions, such as hypothyroidism and Cushing's syndrome
  4. Medications, such as antidepressants and corticosteroids
  5. Age and gender
  6. Psychological factors, such as stress, depression, and anxiety

Some of these risk factors, such as genetics and age, cannot be changed. However, others, such as overeating and a lack of physical activity, can be modified to reduce the risk of developing obesity.

Treatment

The treatment for obesity will depend on the individual and the severity of the condition. Some common treatments include:

  1. Lifestyle changes, such as eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, and losing weight if overweight or obese
  2. Behavioral therapy to address psychological factors, such as stress and depression, that may contribute to overeating
  3. Medications, such as orlistat and liraglutide, to help with weight loss
  4. Bariatric surgery, such as gastric bypass surgery, for people with severe obesity

In some cases, a combination of these treatments may be necessary to manage obesity effectively.

Prevention

Preventing obesity is essential to reducing the risk of developing this condition. Some strategies for preventing obesity include:

  1. Exercising regularly
  2. Eating a healthy diet that is low in sugar, saturated and trans fats
  3. Limiting portion sizes and avoiding high-calorie, high-fat foods
  4. Drinking plenty of water instead of sugary beverages
  5. Getting enough sleep and managing stress
By taking these steps, you can reduce your risk of developing obesity and improve your overall health and well-being.

Conclusion

Obesity is a serious medical condition that affects millions of people worldwide. Understanding the symptoms, causes, and treatment options for obesity is essential to preventing and managing this condition. By making healthy lifestyle choices and seeking medical treatment when necessary, you can reduce your risk of developing obesity and lead a healthy, active life.

Personality, satisfaction linked throughout adult lifespan

  • Personality

Certain traits related to satisfaction in life regardless of age, study says

Read the journal article

  • The Link Between Personality, Global, and Domain-Specific Satisfaction Across the Adult Lifespan (PDF, 537KB)

WASHINGTON — Certain personality traits are associated with satisfaction in life, and despite the changes people may experience in social roles and responsibilities over the course of their adult lives, that association is stable regardless of age, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

“Many studies have shown that people with certain personality profiles are more satisfied with their life than others. Yet, it had not been extensively studied whether this holds true across the lifespan. For example, extraverted—that is sociable, talkative—people might be particularly happy in young adulthood, when they typically are forming new social relationships,” said study co-author Gabriel Olaru, PhD, an assistant professor at Tilburg University. “We thus wanted to examine if some personality traits are more or less relevant to life, social and work satisfaction in specific life phases.”

The research was published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

To determine how the relationship between personality traits and life satisfaction changes over time, researchers analyzed data collected from 2008 to 2019 by the Longitudinal Internet Studies for the Social Sciences (LISS) panel survey, a nationally representative survey of households in the Netherlands. Over 11 years, 9,110 Dutch participants ranging from 16 to 95 years old at the time of the first survey answered multiple questionnaires to assess their Big Five personality traits—openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness and emotional stability/neuroticism—and their satisfaction with their social connections and their life overall. Only the 5,928 participants who were employed at the time of the survey also answered questions about their satisfaction with their work lives.

The researchers found that most of the relationships between personality traits and satisfaction remained the same across the adult lifespan, and that emotional stability was the trait most strongly associated with people’s satisfaction with their life, social connections and career.

“Our findings show that – despite differences in life challenges and social roles – personality traits are relevant for our satisfaction with life, work and social contacts across young, middle and older adulthood,” said Manon van Scheppingen, PhD, an assistant professor at Tilburg University and another co-author on the study. “The personality traits remained equally relevant across the adult lifespan, or became even more interconnected in some cases for work satisfaction.”

The researchers also found that different personality traits were related to people’s satisfaction with their social lives and careers—most notably conscientiousness for work satisfaction, and extraversion and agreeableness for social satisfaction. People who saw increases in these traits across time also reported increases in their life, social and work satisfaction.

People’s satisfaction with their work was the most affected by differences in age. As participants in the study aged, the relationship between career satisfaction and emotional stability grew moderately stronger.

Despite a weaker correlation between openness and life satisfaction overall, the researchers found that people who increased in openness also increased in life satisfaction across the 11 years measured by the LISS survey. This relationship may be explained by indirect processes, according to the researchers.

“Emotional stability likely shows a strong link with global and domain-specific satisfaction because this trait colors people’s general view of the world,” Olaru said.

“A good example of how personality interacts with the environment can be found in the work context. One of our findings was that the link between emotional stability and work satisfaction increases across age. This might be explained by the fact that emotionally stable people are less scared to quit unsatisfactory jobs and more likely to apply for jobs that are more challenging and perhaps more fulfilling and enjoyable in the long run,” van Scheppingen added.

Future studies should examine how variables that change with age, such as income, employment status, marital status and health, affect the relationship between personality traits and overall satisfaction with life, according to the researchers.

“While we did not examine what caused these changes, [the research] shows that our personalities and our happiness are not set in stone,” van Scheppingen said. “Perhaps we may even be able to influence how we change: If we try to become more organized, outgoing, friendly, this might increase life, social or work satisfaction as well.”

Article: “The Link Between Personality, Global, and Domain-Specific Satisfaction Across the Adult Lifespan,” by Gabriel Olaru, PhD, and Manon van Scheppingen, PhD, Tilburg University, Wiebke Bleidorn, PhD, University of Zurich, and Jaap Denissen, PhD, Utrecht University. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, published online March 20, 2023.